Tag Archives: lifestyle branding

Lifestyle Branding: Engagement and the Total Experience

By James D. Roumeliotis

How Is Technology Helping Fashion Lifestyle Brands Connect To Their Human  Side

When you visit your local Porsche dealership be prepared to engage.
Staff will talk to you about the total experience. This will invariably
include discussing the firm’s racing pedigree and performance. In your
mind, you will be able to feel the steering wheel, smell the leather seats,
and hear the roar of the engine. This car represents to you an exclusive
club and you desire to be part of the privileged few. The brand also added its own private race tracks in several parts of the world for its customers to have exhilarating moments testing various models. Clearly, one does
not buy a Porsche simply to go from point A to point B. In practice, you
might use this care to commute to work, but this is not the incentive
to purchase a piece of automobile and racing history.

Porsche is clearly a brand with authenticity and heritage. The principles shaping the consumer’s buying behavior go beyond intention.
There is a sense of engagement in fulfilling a dream. It can be to make
a social status statement or a personal style choice. Whatever it is, it
is not an unconscious choice. The codifiers are clear: This is who I am,
and what I believe in. Ultimately, it can also articulate your sense of
self-worth and your emotional aspirations.

The most important emotional benefit in my view is that a product
of this caliber and class expresses itself when the consumer can declare,
“It suits my lifestyle.”

Lifestyle Brands Matter
Not every brand is a lifestyle brand regardless of whether it strives to
portray itself as such. A company can define itself as a lifestyle brand
when its products promote more than a product with key benefits and
attributes. Note however that lifestyle branding is more than just promoting “a way of life”. It is a product or service that provides consumers with an emotional attachment to the lifestyle of the brand. Think
of Ralph Lauren and you can readily see it is not about the clothes. It
becomes an attachment like Porsche to an exclusive club in which you
can be a member through emotional identification through use of the
products in question.

Savvy companies understand these principles and look to keep
the customer engaged. By doing so, they clearly forge the sort of long
term relationships, which become the envy of their designated sector.
Financial benefits clearly follow, but the raison d’être of the firm must
back up its promotion for this to work effectively. One reason so many
firms want to enter the lifestyle arena is profitability and high profit
margins. Established brands can tap economies of scale when they
launch new products at a cheaper cost to the firm. Surplus revenue can
then be channeled into extensive advertising and promotion costs.

Building a Lifestyle Brand
Generally speaking, a brand that is designed for the lifestyle segment
should have more emotional value to consumers. Features, cost, and
benefits do play a role but by themselves they would be insignificant.
There are companies that become a lifestyle brand by tying their
product ranges to a distinctive culture or group. Marketing guru, Seth
Godin labels this with the key word as a “tribe”. A classic case is Harley
Davidson, who sells branded merchandise to customers whether or
not they own one of the firm’s motorcycles. Other
key lifestyle brands include Nike, Wholefoods, Red Bull, Hackett, Hermes, and Louis Vuitton among others.

In the electronics and computer industries, it is uncommon to have
lifestyle products. However, Apple has broken this “glass ceiling” by its
unconventionality with products which come with its seamless eco-system. Even its ubiquitous white headphones have become a fashion accessory and, some would even argue, a status symbol. The people who follow Apple
and its “lifestyle” are clearly all obsessed in a way that the firm intended
when it embarked on this well-thought-through strategy.

Lifestyle brands have clearly impacted on luxury brand management.
The usual suspects such as BMW, Armani, W Hotels, and Rolex — just
to name a few, have fostered commitment and loyalty with their promotional campaigns. These have given consumers an “associate” status
with all that is glamorous. Just think of Daniel Craig and James Bond.
Sales at Omega thrive on this “Bond engagement”.

The methods to reach a target audience require an integrated marketing/communication strategy. They clearly require taking into consideration and harmonizing the following aspects:
• Experiential Marketing;
• Grassroots marketing;
• Promotional tours;
• Sponsorship of lifestyle events;
• Lifestyle marketing on the Web: think Facebook;
• Viral video marketing;
• Social media/networking (blogs, chat rooms & message boards);
• “Interactive” is key;
• Mobile phone media, text messaging & applications.

Not Every Brand Can be a “Lifestyle”
New research from Kellogg at Northwestern finds that the strategy of
traditional brands to reposition themselves as a “lifestyle” brand may
fail. The reason is not rocket science: they simply fail to “bond” with
their customer base. “The open vistas of lifestyle branding are an illusion,” said Alexander Chernev, lead author of the study and Associate Professor of Marketing at Kellogg. “By switching to lifestyle positioning, brands might be
trading the traditional in-category competition for even fiercer cross-category competition. Now they have to compete not only with their
direct rivals but also with brands from unrelated categories.”

The study reveals how brands serve as a means of self-expression
along with the limitations of expressing a consumer’s identity through
brands. Moreover, the study uncovers customers’ desire for self-expression through brands is finite.

Why Do Some Lifestyle Brands Become A Way Of Life?Fabrik Brands
Credit: Fabrik Brands

In Perspective
Forward-thinking brands are those which will continue to develop creative ideas and solutions that will allow people to interact with each
other and explore, as well as share creative opportunities. Moreover,
those same brands will make it a strategic priority to add pleasure into
the lives of their consumers.

To be sure, there are many excellent examples of lifestyle branding. Just examine the “hotel as lifestyle” creator, Ian Schrager. Since the
1970’s, as an entrepreneur, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of
Ian Schrager Company, he has achieved international recognition for
concepts that have revolutionized both the entertainment and hospitality industries.

His passionate commitment to the modern lifestyle has been
expressed through a series of pioneering concepts:
The hotel is no longer just a place to sleep. It is portrayed as your
home away from home. This allows hotels to act like theater. Think of
the boutique hotel or “cheap chic”, “lobby socializing”, the resort, or
the spa.

His keen instincts for the mood and feel of popular culture were
honed during the 1970s and 1980s, when he and his late business
partner, Steve Rubell, created Studio 54 and Palladium. In 1984, they
turned their attention to Morgan’s Hotel and introduced the concept
of “boutique hotel” to the world, which is today one the hottest segments in hospitality.

The goal of a lifestyle brand is to get people to relate to one another
through a “concept brand.” These brands successfully sell identity, image
and status rather than a “product-service” in the traditional meaning of
the term.

If they are successful in capturing their audience, then they become
legends in their own right. If you examine the published photographic testament to “Il Pelicano” in Tuscany you will understand perfectly the meaning of the lifestyle branding spirit.

________________________________________________________________________

Request your TWO FREE chapters of this popular book with no obligation.

EntrepreneurialEssentials - FrontCover Final

Leave a comment

Filed under 1, ambiance marketing, brand positioning, cult branding, lifestyle branding, lifestyle marketing, luxury lifestyle

Sex and Sensuality in Advertising: Why it is effective and how to refine it

by James D. Roumeliotis

Gucci Guilty Sexy Ad

Add to FacebookAdd to DiggAdd to Del.icio.usAdd to StumbleuponAdd to RedditAdd to BlinklistAdd to TwitterAdd to TechnoratiAdd to Yahoo BuzzAdd to Newsvine

Does sex really sell? It seems to sell but commercially, not morally. Sex in the media has been around as long as media itself ‒ though these days at more extreme levels (from subtle to overt).

They’re not quite selling a product but rather an expression of desire – a lifestyle that can be envisioned with the product or service. It attracts the male audience much more than the female as women are objects of sensual desire for men. It’s no wonder that most sultry ads portray bodacious females.

Marketing and branding via sultry imagery and insinuation

Sex is a primitive instinct which qualifies it as an attention-grabbing technique in the media domain. It’s no wonder a weapon of choice for marketers. Sex also transcends product categories ‒ whether it’s a consumer product such as Axe antiperspirant, a recreational pharmaceutical drug like Viagra or an exotic sports car.

Sexually explicit ads can be controversial and some offensive. They are also subject to socio-cultural climate. As long as they don’t get carried away to borderline pornography, but rather refined, preferably subliminal and certainly not violent or masochistic, the sultry ads can be considered playful and memorable. Their original intent is to create an emotional effect on the viewer. This way, the viewer develops a closer bond with the brand and consequently, stronger recognition. Some ads intentionally incorporate a humorous element which generates further interest for its intended audience.

Fragrance ads by some fashion designers are intentionally created to sell a sultry elixir in a bottle. To succeed and spark emotional purchase desire, its creators have raised the stakes by provoking the visual (as well as the olfactory) senses and causing the consumer to believe that he or she will feel erogenous and desirable with those he or she cares to attract. However, there are few controversial ads which have been banned as they seemingly pushed pop-culture buttons a notch too far.

The benefits of sex in advertising

Businesses have found that sexy ads are a great method for “word-of-mouth” and viral publicity. Their attention grabbing messages have the ability to cut through the clutter of ads and command considerably more views. The intended viewers, however, are mesmerized even as they are absorbing the ad’s underlying subliminal messages.

A case in point: In 2000, Heineken launched the “It’s All About the Beer” campaign. One spot, called “The Premature Pour,” shows an attractive and alluring woman pouring Heineken into a glass. As a result, a guy across the bar reacts by pouring his own beer but nervously pours it too quickly and spills foam all over the table, as well as on himself. The sexual content is tacit, yet blunt. The insinuation in this, and other spots in the campaign, yielded a successful outcome causing sales to rise 13% in the first two quarters following their airing.

Popular men’s magazines like Maxim have experimented often with their covers. By placing a spicy, semi-naked woman on the cover, male readership spikes and outstrips an image of any popular male star whom men can readily relate to.

At Montreal’s renowned steakhouse, Queue de Cheval (French for “horse’s tail”), its eccentric owner, Peter Morentzos ‒ who is known for pushing conventional advertising boundaries, came-up with the idea to host a “Food Porn” event for a charity event. The sold-out $250 per person event featured young hard-body waitresses in skimpy outfits along with shrimps hanging on them which resembled human trays. To promote it, he used the photo of a naked woman’s torso deemed too racy for print in the culinary magazine Gourmet.

What sexually overt ads should avoid

For sexually explicit ads to be effective, they should be created in good taste with respect to the following:

  • Provide a meaningful message through the images;
  • Avoid over-reliance on sex due to saturation as it may lose its intended impact;
  • Should not depict violence, aggression and/or masochism;
  • Shouldn’t be doing it with just any product merely to grab attention but with some relevance utilizing sexual ideas only.

If a brand is willing to risk taking a controversial position to gain attention amongst the crowded product landscape, it should not be excessively overt. It ought to target the brand’s specific market along with not offending its fans and best customers.

Marketers at times tend to step out of line ‒ though, today many consumers happen to be savvy and realize when they’re being manipulated by various media messages. The products touted in the ads may contain sensuous interplay but if they don’t stand-up to their promises and hype, those brands will disappoint and won’t be able to hold onto the customers for long. At the end of the day, the truth in advertising signifies the “trust” factor which is inherently crucial in attracting and retaining clients.

Add to FacebookAdd to DiggAdd to Del.icio.usAdd to StumbleuponAdd to RedditAdd to BlinklistAdd to TwitterAdd to TechnoratiAdd to Yahoo BuzzAdd to Newsvine

_________________________________________

Request your TWO FREE chapters of this popular book with no obligation.

EntrepreneurialEssentials - FrontCover Final

Leave a comment

Filed under 1, Branding, Business, lifestyle marketing, Marketing, marketing strategy, perfume marketing, Sexy branding, sexy marketing

Catering to a “Luxury Lifestyle”: Definition and Execution

by James D. Roumeliotis

Yacht Lifestyle Shot from the Air

Add to FacebookAdd to DiggAdd to Del.icio.usAdd to StumbleuponAdd to RedditAdd to BlinklistAdd to TwitterAdd to TechnoratiAdd to Yahoo BuzzAdd to Newsvine

A “luxury lifestyle” denotes a way of life which is pleasantly enhanced through well crafted products and exceptional services. These include dining at the best restaurants, lounging in the finest hotels, dressing in premium and bespoke clothing, wearing jewellery/watches produced in limited quantities, possessing and driving the most extravagant cars, traveling to exotic destinations, and playing with the most sophisticated tech products – amongst others. Needless to say, those consumers are connoisseurs of the finest products and services money can afford them.

According to a white paper and survey, conducted by the prestigious consulting firm McKinsey & Co., it indicates that there is no widely accepted definition of “luxury lifestyle.” It goes on to say that Attendees of the 2012 Financial Times Business of Luxury Summit suggested the following definitions: “a way of living,” a set of “attitudes and values,” or specific “consumption habits.”  Consumers interviewed in London, Milan, Munich, and Paris gave equally diverse definitions. Some offered a broad perspective (“a way of being, dressing, behaving” that “sets you apart from the rest”); others referred to particular products, brands, and experiences (“staying at nice hotels”); still others took a cynical view (“it’s just brand names, that’s all” or “it’s marketing”). Its interviews with senior executives from luxury- goods companies such as Harry Winston, Hermès, and Roberto Cavalli yielded yet another varied set of definitions, including “embodying the lifestyle of an iconic designer” and “offering a holistic brand experience.” Although they all defined the phrase differently, 70 percent of the executives they interviewed said they regard their brands as luxury-lifestyle brands.

A company can define itself as a lifestyle brand when its products promote more than a product with key benefits and attributes. However, lifestyle branding is more than just promoting “a way of life.” It is a product or service that provides consumers with an emotional attachment to the lifestyle of the brand. Take Versace, for example, which besides its fashion apparel and accessories also has hotels, home furnishing/décor, linens, beauty and more. Giorgio Armani also has his eponymous name on hotels, furniture, fashion, jeans and beauty. From these two fashion icons, we can certainly surmise that they have a legitimate claim as “luxury lifestyle” purveyors.

Developing the luxury standard of living through desirable customer experiences

Lifestyle branding is more than just promoting “a way of life”. it is a product or service that provides consumers with an emotional attachment to the lifestyle of the brand. think of Ralph Lauren and you can readily see it is not about the clothes. it becomes an attachment such as the sports car brand Porsche to an exclusive club in which you can be a member through emotional identification through use of the products in question. Smart companies understand these principles and look to keep the customer engaged. By doing so, they clearly forge the sort of long term relationships, which become the envy of their designated sector.

The “Total Customer Experience” is the sum total of the interactions that a customer has with a company’s products, people, and processes. It goes from the moment when customers see an ad to the moment when they accept delivery of a product and beyond.

The experiences customers go through with a purveyor of luxury determine the ultimate perception of its brand and image. Customer experiences also spread the word (offline/online) to others (friends, relatives etc.) about your brand. That said, each customer contact (“touch points”) should be handled with the utmost care to ensure that the total brand experience a person has is constant.

Lifestyle brands develop emotional attachment

Brand loyalty is about building an emotional, and in some cases, irrational, attachment in a product. The most ideal examples are the diehard brand enthusiasts and early adopters who must get their hands on the latest iPhone or iPad. This happens because Apple has built an emotional attachment to their products by creating a lifestyle choice rather than a product purchase.

It’s about how it makes you feel. Same goes for baby boomers, whether accountants or attorneys or business executives who purchase a Harley Davidson motorcycle and ride them for about four or five hours every Sunday afternoon. The bike makes them feel like a rebel – sort of an escape.

A brand that is designed for a lifestyle should have a much higher emotional value to consumers than one based on features like cost or benefits alone. The goal of a lifestyle brand is to become a way that people can utilize it to relate to one another. Those brands are an attempt to sell an identity, or an image, rather than a product and what it actually does.

Lifestyle brands have gained an increased share of the luxury market such as BMW, Armani, W Hotels, Louis Vuitton and Rolex ‒ just to name a few. These have given way to consumers to buy products that they associate with a “luxurious life.” They are essentially a status symbol.

The luxury lifestyle in the services domain

In the category of “services”, the luxury lifestyle is all about execution in delivering an exceptional experience with pizzazz to the discerning ─ whether it is a bespoke travel excursion in an exotic place, producing an exceptional dining experience or organizing an over-the-top event, each one ought to create a pleasant memory which would want to be repeated.

A successful service related luxury lifestyle exists when the following take place.

– Delivered with passion
– Exclusivity
– Discretion
– Exceeding expectations
– Seamless
– Refined
– Posh
– With attention to detail

Consider American Express − most notably for its “by invitation only” Black/Centurion card. For hotels, worthwhile mentions are the Hotel Plaza Athenée, the Four Seasons (including its private jet tours), the Ritz Carlton, and boutique hotels Hotel du Cap and Hotel de Crillon to name a few prominent ones. They splurge and provide the perfect luxury experience with outstanding service, exclusivity, and pedigree.

Exclusive and bespoke travel companies provide tailor made adventures and excursions. The four key players in this category include: Abercrombie & Kent, Kuoni Travel, Orient-Express and Cunard Line. Broadening our view of luxury services, certain firms offer services and privileges to a rare percentile. Such services include fractional jet ownership such as NetJets and FlexJet, as well as global concierge services such as Quintessentially.

In the final analysis

Whether offering a product or service, it is how a luxury brand delivers an experience that distinguishes it and makes it stand-out from the mainstream. In essence, it’s a holistic approach.

Luxury lifestyle brand offerings should be constantly refreshed, giving discerning customers a reason to repeatedly do business with the brand. Tiffany & Co., decided to undergo “investing in the theater of shopping in its stores”, as its CEO Frederic Cumenal implied as regards to the renovations of its largest store ever which it opened in China.

Selling a distinct lifestyle is what discerning clients crave and gladly relate to. Organizing exclusive by-invitation-only events should be considered. Exclusive events make one feel notable. For example, Italian sports automaker Maserati invited a select number of brand loyalists to a new experience in Europe that gave them the opportunity to sail on-board the 70 ft./21,3 m Maserati sailboat. In addition, they drove models in its current range including the new Maserati Gran Turismo Sport model.

In the end, living the luxury life is irresistible to many from every range of background and nationality. The temptation includes the aspirational affluent.

Add to FacebookAdd to DiggAdd to Del.icio.usAdd to StumbleuponAdd to RedditAdd to BlinklistAdd to TwitterAdd to TechnoratiAdd to Yahoo BuzzAdd to Newsvine

__________________________________________________

Request your TWO FREE chapters of this popular book with no obligation.

 

2 Comments

Filed under 1, Business, description of luxury, discerning clients, discriminating clients, lifestyle marketing, Luxury, luxury lifestyle